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Dizzying Intellect » Repurposing Resources

Repurposing Resources

Disclaimer: I have a personal and overwhelming hatred of corporate buzzwords. My brain just shuts off — my eyes glaze over and I unintentionally stop listening, when someone starts using them. I know what they mean. I just hate them.

“Resource” is the one that really makes me grit my teeth, even though I’ve been hearing it for years. A stapler is a resource, not a person. (And if you have to dehumanize people to do your job, maybe you’re in the wrong profession.)

Anyway, I’m so glad that HR resume readers agree with me.

197 words that can kill a resume (and the HR person reading it)

Imagine a conversation with a self-described envisioneer who, when it comes to mission critical, is on the cutting edge, a proactive people-person capable of meticulously strategizing a paradigm in the aggregate.

Ha. I totally know that guy.

Capobianco and a small crew of writers operating as GW Press uploaded the first edition of the “Resume Dictionary” at ResumeDictionary.com.

“We’re not making much,” Capobianco said. Which sort of adds up since GW Press is giving away the Resume Dictionary for free. Never mind the money. Then came the sequel: “197 Words You Should NOT Use on Your Resume.”

Yes, it’s all here.

From “acute sense of perception” to “white paper” with “deliverables,” “functionalities,” “matrix,” “optimize,” “thusly” and 190 other clunkers in between.

“People are trying to sound smart,” said Capobianco. “But if a human resources person gets a résumé with a made-up word (architected, anyone?) it lands in the reject pile.”

Segue: “Thusly” reminds me of “myself” — which is a personal pet peeve of mine. As in “He asked Kate and myself to lunch.” Dude, the word is “me.” Deal with it.

But that’s a rant for another day.

In an interview, as with a résumé, the trick is to use the English language to communicate rather than impress, says Capobianco.

No wonder every job description I’ve seen in the past month has specified “good communication skills” under the requirements. You eventually have to talk to real humans, not just your corporate-ladder climbing boss.

The website isn’t linked from the article, which is pretty common for the Post-Dispatch, so here it is: Resume Dictionary

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